2021 Programme

Until 18 December, 2021
  • KEVIN HARMAN

    28 April - 22 May, 2021

    An exhibition of monumental new Glassworks by Kevin Harman.

  • Installation view of Kevin Harman's solo exhibition, Ingleby, Edinburgh. Photograph: John McKenzie
  • Jonathan Owen, Untitled, 2019, 19th century marble bust with further carving, 76.5 x 46 x 30 cm. Photograph: John McKenzie

    Jonathan Owen, Untitled, 2019, 19th century marble bust with further carving, 76.5 x 46 x 30 cm. Photograph: John McKenzie

  • JONATHAN OWEN

    29 May – 17 July, 2021

    Jonathan Owen is best known for his interventions into ‘found’ antique sculptures, a process of re-carving and reinventing defunct marble statuary in an attempt - as he puts it - “to subvert and puncture this familiar rhetoric, and so to reactivate the object through transformation rather than destruction, to make a new proposition.

     

    It offers a way of working that seems especially relevant on the present moment, as the conversation around public monuments is so vigorously re-considered and re-phrased to question ideas of permanence and power – attributes so often associated with the original sculptures that are his favoured raw material.

     

    The exhibition includes dramatically re-worked busts of once powerful men, but at its centre we will be unveiling a major new sculpture based on a life-size, allegorical figure of Navigation, a figure that formerly stood proud as symbol of empire and exploration - sextant and rudder at the ready – reduced now to a pile of interlinking chains snaking off its plinth and across the gallery floor.

  • Jonathan Owen in his studio, Edinburgh, 2020. Image: Christopher L. Cook.
  • Alongside this group of new sculptures Owen will also present new 'eraser drawings' - also made by a reductive process, a kind of two-dimensional carving of old book pages – working backwards through layers of ink from blacks through greys to white, gradually removing tone from the surface of the page to delete the foreground subject, and subtly re-form the background.

     

    The first of these, made some years ago, concentrated on removing sculptures from their plinths, but his most recent series have focussed on images from the history of cinema, erasing the foreground figures of Hollywood stars, and reshaping them into the inanimate details of the scenes they once inhabited.

  • Jonathan Owen, Eraser Drawing (Backstage), 2018, Partially erased book page, 38 x 33.5 cm (framed)

    Jonathan Owen, Eraser Drawing (Backstage), 2018, Partially erased book page, 38 x 33.5 cm (framed)

  • FRANK WALTER (1926-2009) | MUSIC OF THE SPHERES

    29 July – 25 September, 2021

    For the 2021 Edinburgh Art Festival Ingleby will present the first ever exhibition devoted to Frank Walter’s ‘spools’ – the small circular paintings which, in their consistency of scale and form, provide a kind of lens through which to witness the workings of Walter’s inner eye.

     

    Walter’s work was unknown during his lifetime, but in the decade since his death he has emerged as one of the most distinctive and intriguing Caribbean voices of the last 50 years. Painted with a rare directness and immediacy, on whatever material came most readily to hand, his works describe a visionary artist – romantically and spiritually inclined in the manner of William Blake or Hilma af Klint – but rooted in the landscape of Antigua, the island of his birth.

     

    His work was the subject of Antigua and Barbuda’s inaugural appearance at the Venice Biennale in 2017, in an exhibition titled Frank Walter: The Last Universal Man, hailed by The New York Times as“the most eye-opening”of all 85 pavilions and which led Hans-Ulrich Obrist to describe him as “a pioneer” author of "an unbelievable body of work, which has not been seen so far. He also wrote poems and worked in nearly all art disciplines. He was the Leonardo da Vinci of Antigua”.

     

    A major retrospective of several hundred works was displayed at MMK Museum of Modern Art Frankfurt in 2020, accompanied by a 420-page monograph in which the art historian and chronicler of Walter’s life Barbara Paca notes:

     

    In their completeness as a group, the spool series brings together all the elements of Walter’s universe, with each painting fitting together in dynamic groupings to provide an investigation into the workings of Walter’s mind… Walter’s use of a round format is a distinct choice loaded with symbolism… circles represent the cyclical, infinite nature of existence…. To borrow Walter’s words, ‘variety comes with the never-ending music of the spheres’. Throughout his artistic practice, Walter, in effect, is striking the balance between the universe’s larger patterns and the smaller details of lived experience.”

     

    (Barbara Paca Phd, OBE, “How I became European: Frank Walter in Retrospect” in Frank Walter A Retrospective, MMK Frankfurt, 2020, pp 398-400)

     

    A new publication devoted to Walter’s Spools will be published to coincide with the exhibition, with contributions by Barbara Paca, Professor Paget Henry, Kenneth Milton and Mary-Elisabeth Moore.

  • Frank Walter, Untitled (Four persimmons), oil on biocomposite material backed with Masonite, 19.5 cm diameter Image (c) Courtesy Kenneth M....

    Frank Walter, Untitled (Four persimmons), oil on biocomposite material backed with Masonite, 19.5 cm diameter

    Image (c) Courtesy Kenneth M. Milton Fine Arts. Photograph by Kenneth Milton.

  • MOYNA FLANNIGAN

    9 October – 18 December, 2021

    Moyna Flannigan’s first exhibition at Ingleby follows her recent presentation at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art and furthers her investigation into the materials and methods of collage as a means of exploring and understanding the fragmentation of society and civilisation.

     

    Her figures, always women, are an amalgam of memories, experiences and ideas, drawn from history, mythology and popular culture. Their identity or essence remains ambiguous, as if they were passing through or suspended just out of reach. Notes of incidental humour are balanced by a darker, almost melancholic, sensibility which unifies the fragments into a new narrative with women at the centre of a story that spans both ancient and modern worlds.

     

    In these newest works, fragments of sculpture join the works on paper and paintings for which the artist is best known, continuing a working practice that often begins by chance – with the artist cutting up her own drawings and re-using abstract body parts to create a new order from the original components.

     

    As she has said - “To a casual observer these images might seem completely disconnected, but for me they have associations to my life, my interests and to memory. I’m looking for ways to connect them in new work…in new formal arrangements like collage, which change the meaning and the impact of the original material.”

  • Moyna Flannigan,Tear 58, 2019, ink, gouache, spray paint and collage on paper, 55 x 43.5 x 3.2 cm (framed). Photograph:...

    Moyna Flannigan,Tear 58, 2019, ink, gouache, spray paint and collage on paper, 55 x 43.5 x 3.2 cm (framed). 
    Photograph: John McKenzie

  • Moyna Flannigan's studio, 2020